Articles about migraine

Original articles about important findings in migraine by leading neurologists and Alec Mian PhD, founder and CEO of Curelator Inc.
Will the Real Mr. Average Please Stand Up? (part 2)
Migraine, one of the leading causes of disability worldwide1 is a model condition if we want to study variation between individuals and the therapeutic implications of these differences. The hallmark of migraine is episodic, debilitating attacks that are easily diagnosed and monitored. In addition, many people with migraine have several attacks per month, so profiling […]
Confabulation, card tricks and confirming your migraine triggers (part 2)
Why is it so hard to identify your migraine triggers?
In the first part of this article, we reviewed data from an ongoing Curelator Headache study. It includes hundreds of migraineurs who believed they knew their triggers before they used Curelator Headache. After our analytical engine applied a statistical analysis (based on three months of their daily data), we concluded that the accuracy of these users’ trigger identification was less than 20%. In this second part of the article, we offer some insight into the difficulty of self-determining migraine triggers. Other than stress and sleep quality (fatigue), it can be exceedingly difficult to self-identify triggers. The first point is to consider the ‘dose’ or ‘potency’ of a trigger. Many factors would trigger headaches in virtually anyone if the ‘dose’ was extreme enough, for example, noise that was extremely loud and went on for a long time, or stress experienced at a high level again over a significant period.
Confabulation, card tricks and confirming your migraine triggers (part 1)
How good are people at determining cause, effect and migraine triggers? (Not very good.)
Consider the fascinating, but disturbing results of a psychology experiment1 Jay Olson recently conducted at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. Olson asked test participants to select a random card while he flicked through a deck of playing cards. Unbeknownst to participants, the 10 of hearts had been slightly altered2 which caused it to be visually exposed for a few milliseconds longer than any of the other cards. As a result, 98% of participants chose the 10 of hearts - not such a random choice afterall!
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